Hot Bicycle Posts

How To: Fix a flat bicycle tire

There's nothing like taking a nice, relaxing bike ride during anytime of the year. Not only do you feel more in touch with your surroundings, but you're able to burn some calories as well. But all the joy and happiness that it brings can quickly be sucked away by a flat tire.

How To: Change a flat bike tire easily

In this video, Scott Paisley shows you how to change a flat bike tire. First, he will teach you how to find why the tire is flat, and how to make sure your tire is free of thorns or other debris that may flatten a new tube, should you put one in. Paisley demonstrates clearly and step-by-step how to change a bike tire. You will also learn tips and tricks to make things easier. Don't stop riding your bike just because you have a flat tire! Watch this video and learn how to fix it correctly.

How To: Change Your Bicycle's Tire, Inspect for Damage, and Detect Hidden Problems

Many things cause a bike tire to deflate. Glass, sharp rocks, tacks, and nails can pierce the tire and puncture the tube within. A tube can be pinched between the rim and tire causing the tube to split when inflated. If a tire has a hole in it, the tube, which is filled with air pressure, will bulge out of the opening and pop. As well, the valve holding the air pressure in the tube can be damaged or faulty.

How To: Install a bicycle computer

PerformanceBikes will show you how to install a bicycle computer. Whether you have a simple computer or a more advanced computer you be able to see the basic instructions. Start by reading the instruction, install the handle bell mounts, install the wireless transmitter. You then install your spoke magnet, then calibrate your computer for your wheel size. Make sure you have read your own particular directions. If its not working, make sure you re-read your instruction, check your set up or ch...

News: The Invisible-Steering Bicycle

This is one stylin' bicycle. Ok, I admit. I stared at the handle bars and marveled. Wow, the designer and driver of this masterpiece must have impeccable balance. You know, the "look ma no-hands type of balance". But I was wrong. The design is even more clever. Finnish designer Olli Erkkila installed a steering rod running through the frame. Venice Beach bicycle fetishists are drooling in envy as you read...

News: Who Needs Spokes? I'd Take a Hubless Bicycle

The Gumby bike. The invisible steering bike. The spokeless bike. All kinda bizarre. All kinda awesome. Designed by Luke Douglas as an entry for the James Dyson Awards, the Lunartic Cycle boasts a toothed belt drive and hubless rear wheel. I want one. Previously, The Invisible-Steering Bicycle.

How To: Change a tire on a Dutch bike

This video shows you how to change a bicycle tire with your bare hands. First, he shows you how to get the tire out. Use the valve cap to let all the air out of the tire tube and then loosen the bead all the way around. Eventually you can just pop the tube off then inspect and patch it. Then you put the tire back on and pump some air into it. Make sure the tire looks like it's seating properly. That is how you change a bicycle tire.

How To: Change a flat clincher tire

Here we see how change a flat tire on a bicycle properly. The video says that once you understand the principles you should be able to do this in three minutes. With the tire off the frame of the bike, be sure all of the air is completely gone. Next is to take off one side of the tire, with some plastic pry tools made for bikes. With the bead of the tire over the rim you should be able to remove that tube with ease. Inflate the new tube just enough so it takes shape. The new tube goes into th...

How To: Change the seat on a beach cruiser bicycle easily

In this clip, learn how to change out the seat on your beach bike. This clip will show you exactly how to take that tough, standard seat that comes with your new bicycle and change it out with a comfier, better seat. The difference between a bumpy ride and a relaxing one is all in the seat cushion, so make sure you have one installed that best fits you.

How To: Remove bike handlebar grips

With a few easy steps you can remove the handlebars from your bike to change the grips, for maintenance or for whatever other reason you might want handlebars off of a bike. Now you'll never have to suffer though old handlebar grips again.

News: The Most Thief-Proof Bike Lock in the World

Germany company Conrad has created a bike lock that would deter even the most dedicated of thieves. The Rube Goldberg-esque device is outfitted with motorized skateboard wheels that elevate the bicycle off the ground, as high as your lamp post or utility pole of choice allows.

How To: Remove a stuck freewheel

In this tutorial, we learn how to remove a stuck freewheel. First, take your crescent wheel and place it on the outside piece of the wheel axle. After this, use a wrench to remove the bolt that is around this, using a big push to help it get out of place. This should be pretty tight, but will come out eventually. Now, place a wrench in the vice and rotate the wheel counter clockwise. When this is finished, you can put the parts back onto the wheel. When finished, the parts should be free to t...

How To: Remove a crank arm with a square taper

In this how-to video, you will learn how to remove a crank arm with a square taper on a bicycle. You will need a crank puller. You will also need two sockets (14mm and 9/16"), a quarter, a socket wrench, and a screwdriver. Use the quarter as a screwdriver to pull off the cover. You can use the screwdriver in case that does not work. Take the 14mm socket, place it in the socket wrench, and twist off the bolt. Take the crank puller and screw it on one end. Twist the lever until the crank is loo...

How To: Ride a bike with no handlebars

Being able to rid a bike without holding on to the handlebars allows you to do all sorts of useful things while on your bike and makes your look like a pro. Watch this video to learn how to do it easily and open up your biking life.

How To: Make your own single speed or fixie bike crank

In this tutorial, we learn how to make a single speed bike crank. You will need: chain ring bolt tool, large screwdriver, Allen wrench, file, hacksaw, vise, and crank set with 2 ring. First, grab your chain ring bolts and cut about 3mm off of the end. If the nut moves while you are cutting it, adjust it. After this, put your chain ring on the inside of the crank arm to align the chain. When you are finished, you will have a single speed bike crank! This tool shouldn't take too long to create,...

How To: Change gears on a bicycle

This how-to video demonstrates the process of switching gears on a bicycle. Depending on the number of chains and hubs, your bike will have a varying number of gears. You should be aware of the terrain and make sure you are in the appropriate gear. Don't change gears under power. Know how and when to change gears to make the bike ride smoother and more enjoyable. Watch this video cycling tutorial and learn how to shift gears on a bicycle.

How To: Switch brake pads

In this video, we learn how to switch brake pads with Marc DiVall. You first want the side that is longer because that's the trailing side. The arrow should also be pointing to the left. If they are rear mounted, that means the brakes are on the wrong side. Go in and remove the mounting nut from the pad and line everything back up. Use your wide washer and spacers to shift around, which will allow your brake pad to rotate. Replace with the washers and then the bolt and then you can place thes...

News: DIY Contortionist-Cycle

Finally, a well designed solution to studio-style living. The Contortionist bicycle. London-native Dominic Hargreaves, unhappy with the available options, designed this folding bike himself (true DIY spirit).

News: Thieves Using GPS Apps

This is just a heads up that thieves are now using GPS fitness apps to target people. Thieves are using popular GPS fitness apps such as Strava to find out where you live where they will then come and steal your bikes.

How To: Understand the parts of a road bike

Jim, from The Bike Tube, describes the parts of a bike so that you understand the parts of a road bike. He starts at the back of the bike and goes through every part of the bike so that you know the names of these parts and where they are located on the bike. Learning the parts is the first step in learning how to care for each functioning part of a bike. From the front wheel to the back wheel, all major bike parts are covered.